News

  • [Singapore_CLC] Collaborative Study Visiting Report between the Center for Livea..
    등록일 2017-02-10 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 6 READS
    How can city planners involve and engage communities at various stages of urban planning and development? The collaborative research between the Centre for Liveable Cities and the Seoul Institute on ‘Community Planning and Rejuvenation’ shares best practices from Singapore and Seoul, including the role of community consultations and planning exercises to balance diverse needs amongst different stakeholders. Find out about other community initiatives shared during a Seoul Institute study visit to Singapore:
  • [UK_ExhibitionWorld] Seoul of Matter
    등록일 2017-02-20 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 7 READS
    Seoul of Matter Tom Hall  Feb 14, 2017 See the Original With new, uniquely Korean, gastronomical, cultural and spiritual attractions to complement its historical mainstays, Seoul is developing in all the right places Newly installed president of the Seoul Tourism Organization (STO) Kim Byung-tae told EW that his goal is to turn Seoul into a destination that improves with repeat visits. “Seoul is very safe and the transportation is very efficient. No matter what field you work in we want to have something catered to your sector. Instead of one catalogue for all events, we want to create a manual for each sector to appeal to their niche interests,” says Byung-tae. The dedicated meeting and exhibition centres in Seoul include Coex, which features 36,000sqm of space including a  hall for up to 7,000 visitors. The Dongdaenum Design Plaza, designed by Zaha Hadid, rivals this space, with a modernist 8,206sqm Academy Hall, which has been used by the likes of fashion house Chanel. Meanwhile, the Floating Islands (somesevit.com) provide bespoke exhibition options. As the largest exhibition centre in Korea, KINTEX has 10 exhibition halls that span 108,55sqm and 40 meeting rooms that cover 13,303sqm. Since its opening in April 2005, KINTEX has undergone two of three scheduled expansions. September of 2011 marked the completion of the second expansion, adding 53,97sqm of exhibition space. To make the destination even more hospitable, a spate of world class hotels have popped up, including the stunning 317-room Four Seasons hotel, which recently joined the likes of the InterContinental Seoul Coex, Samsung-owned The Shilla and Seoul Millennium Hilton and Plaza Hotel. Elsewhere, Lotte Hotels is increasing its luxury imprint on the city. More info: www.kintex.com www.miceseoul.com
  • [Sigapore_Asia One News] Seoul to put up devices to reduce bad smells from waste..
    등록일 2017-02-20 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 3 READS
    Seoul to put up devices to reduce bad smells from waste pipes Monday, Feb 13, 2017 See the original (Click Here) The Seoul Metropolitan Government said Sunday that it would install malodor reduction devices in 10 more places in the capital to prevent bad smells wafting from waste pipes. The city government said it was part of Seoul's efforts to reduce the number of civil complaints about bad smells by 30 per cent by 2018. In June last year, the city government vowed to inject 170 million won (S$210,000) to install malodor reduction devices. Malodor reduction devices, similar to air purification systems, work by injecting oxygen to prevent gas stored inside septic tanks from being released through manholes or inlets on streets. It costs approximately 2 million won to install such a device in a five-story building. By the end of last year, the city government completed installing the devices in areas frequented by visitors and tourists including Gwanghwamun and Myeong-dong. Malodor is a major bugbear in metropolitan cities and considered a major form of pollution, along with light and noise. "We aim to continuously work on reducing bad smells in Seoul and create a pleasant living environment for all citizens," said Kwon Ki-wook from Seoul City Hall's Water Circulation Safety Bureau. The city will also create a so-called odour pollution city map to allow citizens to view the status of malodor complaints and installation of malodor reduction devices in the capital, Kwon added. In 2003, the government enacted the Malodor Prevention Act and defined malodor as "any odour that causes displeasure and disgust to people by stimulating their olfactory sense with hydrogen sulfide, mercaptane, amines, or other pungent substances." Facilities that emit malodor can be legally required to pay for the cost of operating public malodor treatment facilities.
  • [US_Sustainable Brands] Trending: UK Emerges as Sharing Economy Hub While Korea ..
    등록일 2017-02-20 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 9 READS
    Trending: UK Emerges as Sharing Economy Hub While Korea Treads Carefully by Libby MacCarthy February 15, 2017 See the original (Click Here) People have been sharing goods and services with one another since the beginning of time, but it was not until recently that this age-old practice revealed itself a force of transformation for the economy. Disrupting traditional business practices and paving the way to a new era, the sharing economy shows no sign of slowing down. And while some are embracing it, others remain resistant. Despite economic uncertainty caused by Brexit, the sharing economy is flourishing in the UK, according to a recent PwC analysis. Five of the UK’s biggest sharing economy sectors are expected to grow by as much as £8 billion this year alone. Driven by an increasingly entrepreneurial and digitally literate population, the UK represents one of the fastest growing sharing economies in Europe, with transactions doubling year-on-year, from £3.9 billion in 2014 to £7.4 billion in 2015 and approximately £13 billion in 2016. “Trust will continue to be the key sharing economy issue in 2017,” said PwC economist Rob Vaughn. “To tackle this, we expect platforms to implement proactive new forms of self-regulation this year. The interaction between the sharing economy and the tax system is also set to move into the spotlight, as the implications of legal cases become clearer. Policymakers will need to show a bold appetite to try new policy approaches and foster a spirit of collaboration between all stakeholders to find the right balance between protection and flexibility.” Collaborative finance and peer-to-peer (P2P) accommodation constitute two of the largest markets in terms of volume of activity, accounting between them for over three-quarters of the UK’s total. Recent estimates highlight that the UK makeups up nearly 80 percent of Europe’s alternative finance market and at a city-level, London is now Airbnb’s third biggest city in terms of places to stay globally, and is the home to leaders in peer-to-peer accommodation including Onefinestay, who serve the luxury end of the market. But in terms of revenues, peer-to-peer transportation is the UK’s biggest sharing economy sector, capturing over a third of UK platform revenues, with short distance ride-hailing services such as Uber and car clubs such as Zipcar proving particularly popular. Looking ahead, peer-to-peer transportation is expected to remain the largest sector of the UK sharing economy as measured by revenues, drive by urban ride-sharing apps and parking sharing platforms growing at over 35 percent. However, it is on-demand household services that PwC says will be the fastest growing sharing economy sector, with revenues set to expand at roughly 45 percent a year to 2025. There is also a sizable growth opportunity for on-demand professional services — carried out by qualified experts — which PwC forecasts to expand by 40 percent per year to €20 billion of annual transactions in Europe by 2025. Interestingly, PwC points to ‘silver surfers’ — or over 50’s — as the fastest growing user group for peer-to-peer platforms, including Airbnb and DogVacay. By 2025, PwC forecasts that total transactions in the UK sharing economy could reach £140 billion. Industries where cost pressures are mounting, such as healthcare and retail, have the most to gain from the sharing economy, PwC says, and some new models in these sectors such as MedZed and Heal in healthcare and Rent the Runway and Bag, Borrow or Steal in retail could make headways this year. “Innovation will remain crucial to success in the sharing economy,” Vaughn added. “A number of established players branched out into new service offerings in 2016 and we expect them to invest significantly in these this year. The success of these new services will be an acid test of whether sharing economy platforms can eventually become the established leaders of their markets, or will forever be known as the ‘disruptors.’” Meanwhile, Korea is taking a more reserved approach to the sharing economy — one that could create obstacles for growth. Seoul mayor Park Won-soon is a strong proponent for P2P and wants to make the South Korean capital a global leader in the sharing economy, but actions speak louder than words. Foreign entry into the Korean market has proven to be an uphill battle. Airbnb has faced pressure to delete accommodations the government considers illegal — which equates to approximately 70 percent of its listings nationwide — and is still in the midst of a court battle with the Korean government over brokering and cancellation fees. Uber experienced a significant amount of pushback from local government and taxi unions as well, which ultimately resulted in founder Travis Kalanick being indicted. While Park insists that startups are a crucial component of the success of Seoul’s free-market economy and should be welcomed, but he believes that they must follow the same rules. In regards to Uber, the mayor said that the company refused to cooperate and that he “had no choice” but to uphold Korean laws. Uber was eventually able to come to a compromise with the government, but not until after KakaoTaxi, a taxi-hailing app created Korea’s mobile giant Kakao, had already asserted its place of dominance in the market. The measures taken against foreign startups have been viewed as an example of Korean protectionism, but Park has denied these claims. Regulatory pushback against Airbnb has been attributed to ensuring basic sanitation, safety and taxes to protect consumers. It appears though that Airbnb has learned from Uber’s past mistakes, having made considerable efforts to be compliant, including meeting with government on several occasions to negotiate. Park envisions the sharing economy for Korea as “restoring a sense of community,” and supporting local startups. In 2012, he launched the Sharing City project to do just that. The project assists Korean startups like P2P accommodation provider BnbHero and car-sharing platform SoCar. However, the success of the program has largely been overshadowed by a dependence on government funds, a lack of successful role models and outdated federal regulations that aren't conducive to growth.  

Archives

  • [Arirang TV] 21st Century City Report: Part1 Challenges and Visions
    등록일 2016-12-09 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 32 READS
  • [Rutgers SPAA] Seoul’s e-Governance Policy Study
    등록일 2017-02-20 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 3 READS
    Contents  Chapter 1: Introduction of Seoul Metropolitan Government’s e-Governance Policy Study 1. Introduction....................................................................................................................2 1.1. Objectives of Study 1.2. Selection of the Exemplary Cases 1.3. About Rutgers SPAA 1.4. Participating Researchers 2. Introduction: City of Seoul Metropolitan Government e-Governance Policy...............5 2.1 History of Seoul Metropolitan Government’s e-Government 2.2. E-Government Infrastructure 3. Seoul’s e-Government Strategies...................................................................................8 3.1. Utilize Big Data to Offer Scientific and Innovative, New Administrative Services 3.2. Pursue Mobile-Centered Innovations in City Administration 4. Ongoing Efforts: Global Digital Seoul 2020..................................................................9 4.1. Background and Future Direction of Global Digital Seoul 2020 5. Future of Seoul’s e-Government...................................................................................10   Chapter 2: Administrative e-Communication Policy with the Public 1. Policy Background........................................................................................................12 2. Policy Introduction........................................................................................................14 2.1. Eung-Dap-So (Civil Complaint and Proposal Integrated System)              2.2. mVoting (Simply ask and all can vote through SMG Mobile Voting APP) 2.3. 120 Dasan Call Center (Quick Q&A, Citizen-centered Call Center) 2.4. Oasis (Oasis of 10 Million Imagination: Bringing Ideas into Reality) 3. Eung-Dap-So.................................................................................................................18 3.1. Policy Goal, Performance and Outcomes                                 3.1.1. Policy Goal                                 3.1.2. Performance and Outcomes 3.2. Policy Details                                  3.2.1. Main Functions                                   3.2.2. Composition and Details 3.3. The Case of Singapore 4. mVoting.......................................................................................................................30 4.1. Policy Goal, Performance and Outcomes                                  4.1.1. Policy Goal                                 4.1.2. Performance and Outcome 4.2. Policy Details                                 4.2.1. Main Functions                                 4.2.2. Composition and Details 5. 120 Dasan Call Center.................................................................................................37 5.1. Policy Goal, Performance and Outcomes                                 5.1.1. Policy Goal                                 5.1.2. Performance and Outcomes 5.2. Policy Details                                 5.2.1. Main Functions                                 5.2.2. Composition and Details 5.3. The Case on New York City 6. Oasis of 10 Million Imagination.................................................................................46 6.1. Policy Goal, Performance and Outcomes                                 6.1.1. Policy Goal                                 6.1.2. Performance and Outcomes 6.2. Policy Details                                 6.2.1. Major Functions                                 6.2.2. Details and Composition 6.3. The Case of Tokyo, Japan 7. Conclusion.................................................................................................................57 7.1. Implication: How do we Prepare for e-Communication Policy? 7.2. Policy Recommendation Chapter 3: Geospatial Information Service (GIS) 1. Policy Background....................................................................................................67 2. Policy Goals and Implementation Strategies............................................................67             2.1. High Efficient Model of SMG’s Geospatial Information Service (GIS) 2.2. GIS Strategies of Seoul Metropolitan Government 3. Implementation and Effects of GIS...........................................................................69             3.1. Government to Citizen                          3.1.1 Seoul Map Website                          3.1.2. Smart Complaint Register in Seoul Map Website                           3.1.3. 3D Indoor Spatial Information                          3.1.4. Geospatial Information Platform                          3.1.5. Map Tagging Service 4. Process of Geospatial Information Service Initiatives.............................................85 5. Case Study................................................................................................................86 6. Challenges and Opportunities...................................................................................90  Chapter 4: e-Government Best Practices – Electronic Tax (ETAX) and        the Open Tax Court 1. Anytime, Anywhere Pay Tax Quickly and Easily With ETAX...............................99 1.1. Seoul ETAX Function 1.2. Expectations from ETAX 1.3. Vision of ETAX 2. The Open Tax Court...............................................................................................106 2.1. The Trial Strategy 2.2 The Open Tax Court’s Objectives 2.3 The Open Tax Court’s Benefits 2.4. The Open Tax Court’s Obstacles and Overcome Method 2.5. The Open Tax Court’s Positive Results   Chapter 5: World e-Government Organization (WeGO) 1. Background...........................................................................................................114 2. Goals and Implementation Strategies...................................................................117 3. Implementation and Its Effects.............................................................................120 3.1. The Organizational Function of WeGO: Implementation 3.2. The Right from WeGO: Effect 1             3.3. WeGO’s e-Government Framework (eGovFrame) Project: Effect 2             3.4. WeGO Consultation Project: Feasibility Study (F/S) Projects: Effect 3             3.5. WeGO’s City e-Government Diagnostic and Solution Online Platform (CeDS):           Effect 4             3.6. WeGO’s e-Government Training: Effect 5 3.7. WeGO Awards: Effect 6 3.8. Future Plan of WeGO 4. Challenges and Opportunities..............................................................................144            4.1. Analysis of WeGO’s influence of and suggestions for the future 5. Conclusion...........................................................................................................148  Chapter 6 Conclusion: Lessons from the Seoul Metropolitan Government e-Government Study..............151  References..............................................................................................................154  
  • [Publication] Seoul-Sustainable-Energy-Action-Plan_Presskit and Report
    등록일 2017-02-17 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 1 READS
  • 2016 Seoul at a Glance
    등록일 2017-01-19 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 18 READS
  • CITYNET 로고이미지
  • ICLEI 로고이미지
  • UNHABITAT 로고이미지
  • WEGOV 로고이미지
  • WORLDBANK 로고이미지
  • KOICA 로고이미지
  • KOTRA 로고이미지
  • 서울시청의 로고
  • K-Developedia 로고 이미지
  • MITI – Metropolis International Training Institute

The main mission of the Metropolis International Training Institute (MITI) is to strengthen the institutional and professional capacities of local and metropolitan authorities and their leaders for better public governance.

The Metropolis International Training Institute (MITI) is the training and learning center of Metropolis, established in 1996.Today, MITI counts on headquarters located in Seoul, and four regional centers: Cairo, Mashhad, Mexico City and Paris (Île-de-France). Formerly located in Montreal, the headquarters have been transferred to Seoul after a decision taken at the Metropolis Board of Directors’ meeting in Guangzhou, in 2012.

With its relaunch in Seoul, MITI enters a new era of knowledge dissemination, with the boosted activation of its regional centers. MITI will spare no efforts to operate training programs in line with other Metropolis activities, for all members of the Association, and also for its institutional partners and affiliated cities.
  • Metropolis 로고이미지
  • World Cities Summit 로고이미지
  • CLC 로고이미지
  • 해외건설협회 로고이미지
  • ADB 로고이미지
  • 기재부 로고이미지
  • 외교부 로고이미지
  • 수출입은행 로고이미지
  • 금융투자협회 로고이미지
  • KDI 로고이미지
  • 대한상공회의소 로고이미지
  • 중소기업중앙회 로고이미지
  • 대한국토 로고이미지
  • KOSMIC 로고이미지
  • 서울시립대
  • metta
  • 국토연구원
  • UN SDG 온라인플랫폼
  • 공유도시(Sharing City) 서울은?

시간, 공간, 재능, 물건, 정보 등 누구나 소유하고 있는 것을 함께 나누어 활용함으로써 쓰지 않고 놀리는 자원을 효율적으로 활용하고, 지역경제를 활성화하며, 이웃과 공동체 의식도 형성하고, 환경에도 이로운 활동인 '공유'가 활성화된 도시입니다.

'공유도시 서울' 정책을 추진하게 된 이유는?

복지, 환경, 일자리 등에서 사회적 수요는 급증하고 있으나 한정된 예산과 자원으로 이를 해결하는데 많은 어려움이 있습니다. 또한 급격한 도시화로 공동체 의식이 실종되었고, 과잉소비에 따른 자원고갈과 환경오염 문제가 지속적으로 발생하고 있습니다.
이러한 해결이 어려운 도시의 경제적, 사회적, 환경적 문제들을 '공유'라는 새로운 방법을 통해 완화시켜 나가고자 합니다.