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  • [Singapore_The Straits Times] Seoul wins Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize
    등록일 2018-03-20 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 21 READS
    Seoul wins Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize Rahimah Rashith PUBLISHEDMAR 17, 2018, 5:00 AM SGT   South Korean capital honoured for giving up roads and highways for people-centric spaces Source: http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/seoul-wins-lee-kuan-yew-world-city-prize-0 <https://www.leekuanyewworldcityprize.com.sg/>   In the South Korean capital Seoul, highways and main roads have made way for public spaces for the people. At Cheonggyecheon, in downtown Seoul, an elevated highway was removed to restore a stream and create a natural recreational space. And Yonsei-ro, a 550m stretch of road lined with shops was pedestrianised so that visitors can enjoy the space more. Before vehicle access was controlled, roads there were congested and cars crawled at 10kmh. Now cars in Yonsei-ro make way for people to enjoy public performances on its streets. These car-lite moves in "shifting away from car-oriented transportation to people-centric spaces" were among the reasons Seoul was picked as the winner of the Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize. The announcement was made at the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) Centre yesterday. Seoul is the fifth recipient, after earlier wins by Medellin in Colombia, Suzhou in China, Bilbao in Spain and New York City in the US. The city beat 28 others to clinch the biennial award by URA and the Centre for Liveable Cities. Hamburg in Germany, Kazan in the Russian Federation, Surabaya in Indonesia and Tokyo in Japan received special mentions for good practices in their city management. The Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize is an international award honouring outstanding achievements in the creation of liveable, vibrant and sustainable urban communities around the world. "Seoul once appeared as a city drowning in problems beyond solutions. Amazingly, strong creative leadership, building on deep citizen engagement and data-driven solutions, managed to turn things around. This mega city now leads the way in delivering inclusive, dynamic and forward-looking urban solutions. "It is a truly worthy recipient of the Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize," said the nominating committee's chairman, Professor Kishore Mahbubani. Seoul overcame challenges such as rapid urbanisation and the task of providing for a booming car-based society by introducing projects that repurposed urban infrastructure and engaging citizen participation in day-to-day operations. Crediting Seoul's citizens for the win, Mayor Park Won Soon said: "I believe that this award is a recognition of the citizens of Seoul's retrospection of the past and insight into the future in order to make Seoul a 'meta-polis'." The Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize comprises an award certificate, a gold medallion and a cash prize of $300,000, sponsored by Keppel Corporation. It is a highlight of the upcoming World Cities Summit, which will be held at Marina Bay Sands from July 8 to 12. A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 17, 2018, with the headline 'Seoul wins Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize'. Print Edition | Subscribe Related to this article more:   Seoul wins Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize 2018 https://www.opengovasia.com/articles/seoul-wins-lee-kuan-yew-world-city-prize-2018   Seoul clinches Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize honouring urban initiatives https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/seoul-clinches-lee-kuan-yew-world-city-prize-10049890 Seoul, South Korea conferred Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize 2018 https://www.ura.gov.sg/Corporate/Media-Room/Media-Releases/pr18-14 Seoul clinches Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize honouring urban initiatives http://www.intellasia.net/seoul-clinches-lee-kuan-yew-world-city-prize-honouring-urban-initiatives-656860 Kreatif dan Inovatif, Surabaya Raih Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize 2018 https://regional.kompas.com/read/2018/03/18/20342521/kreatif-dan-inovatif-surabaya-raih-lee-kuan-yew-world-city-prize-2018. 
  • [Australia_The Conversation] Robot cities: three urban prototypes for future liv..
    등록일 2018-04-17 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 7 READS
    Robot cities: three urban prototypes for future living Before I started working on real-world robots, I wrote about their fictional and historical ancestors. This isn’t so far removed from what I do now. In factories, labs, and of course science fiction, imaginary robots keep fuelling our imagination about artificial humans and autonomous machines. Real-world robots remain surprisingly dysfunctional, although they are steadily infiltrating urban areas across the globe. This fourth industrial revolution driven by robots is shaping urban spaces and urban life in response to opportunities and challenges in economic, social, political and healthcare domains. Our cities are becoming too big for humans to manage. Good city governance enables and maintains smooth flow of things, data, and people. These include public services, traffic, and delivery services. Long queues in hospitals and banks imply poor management. Traffic congestion demonstrates that roads and traffic systems are inadequate. Goods that we increasingly order online don’t arrive fast enough. And the wi-fi often fails our 24/7 digital needs. In sum, urban life, characterised by environmental pollution, speedy life, traffic congestion, connectivity and increased consumption, needs robotic solutions – or so we are lead to believe. In the past five years, national governments have started to see automation as the key to (better) urban futures. Many cities are becoming test beds for national and local governments for experimenting with robots in social spaces, where robots have both practical purpose (to facilitate everyday life) and a very symbolic role (to demonstrate good city governance). Whether through autonomous cars, automated pharmacists, service robots in local stores, or autonomous drones delivering Amazon parcels, cities are being automated at a steady pace. Many large cities (Seoul, Tokyo, Shenzhen, Singapore, Dubai, London, San Francisco) serve as test beds for autonomous vehicle trials in a competitive race to develop “self-driving” cars. Automated ports and warehouses are also increasingly automated and robotised. Testing of delivery robots and drones is gathering pace beyond the warehouse gates. Automated control systems are monitoring, regulating and optimising traffic flows. Automated vertical farms are innovating production of food in “non-agricultural” urban areas around the world. New mobile health technologies carry promise of healthcare “beyond the hospital”. Social robots in many guises – from police officers to restaurant waiters – are appearing in urban public and commercial spaces. As these examples show, urban automation is taking place in fits and starts, ignoring some areas and racing ahead in others. But as yet, no one seems to be taking account of all of these various and interconnected developments. So how are we to forecast our cities of the future? Only a broad view allows us to do this. To give a sense, here are three examples: Tokyo, Dubai and Singapore. Tokyo Currently preparing to host the Olympics 2020, Japan’s government also plans to use the event to showcase many new robotic technologies. Tokyo is therefore becoming an urban living lab. The institution in charge is the Robot Revolution Realisation Council, established in 2014 by the government of Japan. The main objectives of Japan’s robotisation are economic reinvigoration, cultural branding and international demonstration. In line with this, the Olympics will be used to introduce and influence global technology trajectories. In the government’s vision for the Olympics, robot taxis transport tourists across the city, smart wheelchairs greet Paralympians at the airport, ubiquitous service robots greet customers in 20-plus languages, and interactively augmented foreigners speak with the local population in Japanese. Tokyo shows us what the process of state-controlled creation of a robotic city looks like. Singapore Singapore, on the other hand, is a “smart city”. Its government is experimenting with robots with a different objective: as physical extensions of existing systems to improve management and control of the city. In Singapore, the techno-futuristic national narrative sees robots and automated systems as a “natural” extension of the existing smart urban ecosystem. This vision is unfolding through autonomous delivery robots (the Singapore Post’s delivery drone trials in partnership with AirBus helicopters) and driverless bus shuttles from Easymile, EZ10. Meanwhile, Singapore hotels are employing state-subsidised service robots to clean rooms and deliver linen and supplies and robots for early childhood education have been piloted to understand how robots can be used in pre-schools in the future. Health and social care is one of the fastest growing industries for robots and automation in Singapore and globally. Dubai Dubai is another emerging prototype of a state-controlled smart city. But rather than seeing robotisation simply as a way to improve the running of systems, Dubai is intensively robotising public services with the aim of creating the “happiest city on Earth”. Urban robot experimentation in Dubai reveals that authoritarian state regimes are finding innovative ways to use robots in public services, transportation, policing and surveillance. National governments are in competition to position themselves on the global politico-economic landscape through robotics, and they are also striving to position themselves as regional leaders. This was the thinking behind the city’s September 2017 test flight of a flying taxi developed by the German drone firm Volocopter – staged to “lead the Arab world in innovation”. Dubai’s objective is to automate 25% of its transport system by 2030. It is currently also experimenting with Barcelona-based PAL Robotics’ humanoid police officer and Singapore-based vehicle OUTSAW. If the experiments are successful, the government has announced it will robotise 25% of the police force by 2030. While imaginary robots are fuelling our imagination more than ever – from Ghost in the Shell to Blade Runner 2049 – real-world robots make us rethink our urban lives. These three urban robotic living labs – Tokyo, Singapore, Dubai – help us gauge what kind of future is being created, and by whom. From hyper-robotised Tokyo to smartest Singapore and happy, crime free Dubai, these three comparisons show that, no matter what the context, robots are perceived as means to achieve global futures based on a specific national imagination. Just like the films, they demonstrate the role of the state in envisioning and creating that future.
  • [Italy_IPS News Agency] How Citizen Power Ignited Seoul’s Energy Innovations
    등록일 2018-04-09 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 4 READS
    How Citizen Power Ignited Seoul’s Energy Innovations IPS News Agency  2018.4.5.Thursday 원문 보기:http://www.ipsnews.net/2018/04/citizen-power-ignited-seouls-energy-innovations/ SEOUL, South Korea, Apr 5 2018 (IPS) - In a bid to reduce its nuclear energy dependence, Seoul embarked on a massive energy reduction initiative—shaped by citizen participation—in 2012. The result was a drastic drop in energy use as citizens and corporations embraced the switch to energy-efficient alternatives and took charge of their energy usage. The 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster in neighbouring Japan gave a great sense of crisis to South Korea. Climate change response begins with energy reduction. Hence, Seoul began pursuing the One Less Nuclear Power Plant initiative with its 10 million citizens in April 2012. Operating on the principle of first communicating with citizens before choosing policy directions, the government began by initiating large-scale discussions. To do this, we created the Citizens Committee—comprising citizens from all walks of life, including professionals, academic circles, religious circles and civic groups—to lead the discussions and the civic governance. Eighteen events were held to hear what citizens and organisations had to say about energy reduction. A government team, whose sole role was to communicate with citizens, was also created. It used online communication channels like Twitter and Facebook, as well as offline communication channels, such as policy workshops, deliberation processes and citizens’ podiums to get feedback. To involve senior citizens who lacked internet access, the government reached out to organisations, associations and communities that already worked with them. The One Less Nuclear Power Plant initiative was therefore led by the citizens, for the citizens, and with the citizens. Civic governance was, and continues to be, the essence of our One Less Nuclear Power Plant initiative. Reflecting all of the opinions of the citizens in our policies was not an easy task. At times, it caused delays in the decision-making process and the implementation process. There seemed to be endless discussions on how to elicit the participation of the citizens. It was a challenge. But it brought together the wisdom of 10 million citizens, and it brought about changes in the direction of our policies and improvements in existing regulations. The public discussions generated ideas on tapping alternative or renewable forms of energy: mini solar panels were installed on the rooftops of houses, schools and public buildings while sewage water heat, chimney waste heat and other forms of wasted energy were converted to renewable energy. To boost energy efficiency, buildings, which accounted for 56% of energy use, were retrofitted. Even though energy is a crucial part of our daily lives, it was difficult to promote the value of policies or to encourage participation, as it is “invisible”. The government tried to raise awareness of our energy policies with the Eco Mileage Programme, which rewarded households that voluntarily reduced energy usage by lowering their electricity bills. More than 42% of households took part. As a result, energy reduction has become a part of our citizens’ daily lives in homes, schools, and workplaces—it has become a part of Seoul’s culture. Currently, 22,000 students in 500 schools are energy guardian angels who help to prevent energy wastage in homes and schools, and 34 universities are green campuses that have reduced energy usage by 10%. Small changes in the habits of the citizens in their daily lives have brought about big changes in the energy future of the city. We achieved the first phase goal of reducing 2 million tonnes of oil (the energy generated by one nuclear plant) six months ahead of schedule in June 2014. Many people believed it to be impossible. But we have not stopped there. We have set a second phase goal of reducing the energy equivalent to two nuclear power plants by 2020 and reducing 10 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions as well. The changes brought about by Seoul are spreading to other cities across South Korea. Last November, four local governments in South Korea, including Seoul, recognised the importance of local energy policies, and announced in a joint statement to cooperate on the wise and frugal use of clean and safe energy for a mutually prosperous future. The changes driven by the citizens are inspiring not only for cities in South Korea but also for cities around the world. Many representatives of cities and organisations around the world are coming to Seoul to learn about our One Less Nuclear Power Plant initiative. Many ask me: How did Seoul do it? My answer: The citizens did it. The citizens are the energy. Civic governance, powered by the energy of the citizens, drove the changes. Seoul now looks beyond the changes in Seoul and the changes in South Korea to the changes in the world. We now look beyond civic governance to urban governance. We aspire to cooperate with cities around the world for a sustainably prosperous future. Small actions lead to small changes, which lead to bigger changes. Our actions will form the Earth’s future. A dream we dream together will come true. I hope that the climate action story of the citizens of Seoul will become an important chapter in the history of the earth. Small changes in the habits of the citizens in their daily lives have brought about big changes in the energy future of the city. We achieved the first phase goal of reducing 2 million tonnes of oil (the energy generated by one nuclear plant) six months ahead of schedule in June 2014. Many people believed it to be impossible. But we have not stopped there. We have set a second phase goal of reducing the energy equivalent to two nuclear power plants by 2020 and reducing 10 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions as well. The changes brought about by Seoul are spreading to other cities across South Korea. Last November, four local governments in South Korea, including Seoul, recognised the importance of local energy policies, and announced in a joint statement to cooperate on the wise and frugal use of clean and safe energy for a mutually prosperous future. The changes driven by the citizens are inspiring not only for cities in South Korea but also for cities around the world. Many representatives of cities and organisations around the world are coming to Seoul to learn about our One Less Nuclear Power Plant initiative. Many ask me: How did Seoul do it? My answer: The citizens did it. The citizens are the energy. Civic governance, powered by the energy of the citizens, drove the changes. Seoul now looks beyond the changes in Seoul and the changes in South Korea to the changes in the world. We now look beyond civic governance to urban governance. We aspire to cooperate with cities around the world for a sustainably prosperous future. Small actions lead to small changes, which lead to bigger changes. Our actions will form the Earth’s future. A dream we dream together will come true. I hope that the climate action story of the citizens of Seoul will become an important chapter in the history of the earth. The link to the original article: https://www.clc.gov.sg/documents/publications/urban-solutions/issue9/us_i9_5_counterpoint.pdf
  • [US_Coin Telegraph] Seoul Mayor Aims To Launch Capital’s Own Crypto, Establish B..
    등록일 2018-04-03 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 2 READS
    Seoul Mayor Aims To Launch Capital’s Own Crypto, Establish Better Environment For Blockchain Startups\   Coin Telegraph_Ana Alexandre March.30.2018 Source: https://cointelegraph.com/news/seoul-mayor-aims-to-launch-capitals-own-crypto-establish-better-environment-for-blockchain-startups   Park Won-soon, the mayor of Seoul, has declared his intentions to launch South Korean capital’s own cryptocurrency and create a better environment for the development of Blockchain and digital currency projects in the city, the news outlet Hankyoreh reported March 30, referencing an interview with Coindesk Korea. Park made a public announcement on March 22, stating that he would pursue the creation of Blockchain-oriented industrial clusters and startups and work towards the development of Seoul’s own cryptocurrency ‘S coin.’ To achieve this goal, he will reportedly help prepare the necessary institutional and legal foundations: "As Seoul is the world's leading city in the field of information and communications, including the 4th industrial revolution, I think it should naturally study new technologies such as blockchains. … In order to make an S coin, we must prepare institutional and legal backing such as ordinances," the mayor said. Following Estonia’s lead in its Blockchain-based project to help transition the country’s society into a digital environment, Park addressed the potential use of the technology in all administrative functions of Seoul, such as public transportation and electricity, water and gas infrastructure management. The Hankyoreh reported that Seoul’s Blockchain initiatives are expected to be introduced in April this year. Finally, Park commented on the Korean government’s strict policies in regards to cryptocurrency, suggesting the possibility of a more free regulatory environment in the future: "The last time the Ministry of Justice announced regulatory measures, it was a tremendous resistance, and the government seemed to think deeply about it. First, it is the local government's task to create cases and models. If the Seoul government releases certain regulations, it will be able to make the model more freely." In November 2017, the Seoul Metropolitan Government announced its collaboration with Samsung SDS to develop an information strategy plan for the Seoul city’s Blockchain-based municipal innovation by 2022, targeting welfare, public safety and transportation. The project is also aimed at increasing transparency for government services.  

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  • [Videol Seoul wins World City Prize
    등록일 2018-04-09 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 8 READS
    Seoul wins Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize from Seoulsolution on Vimeo.
  • [SI Report] Shaping Seoul with Citizens_2018_Ju-Hea Jang
    등록일 2018-03-21 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 11 READS
    Shaping Seoul with Citizens   Re-establishing Seoul as One of the Greatest Cities on Earth From A to Z about the Policies Transforming Seoul, Shaped with and by Citizens “This book consists of five chapters. Chapter 1 outlines the SMG’s achievements, with Mayor Park at the helm, in the areas of the social economy, economic infrastructure development, and tourism under the vision of “creating sustainable and secure jobs.” Chapter 2 discusses the SMG’s achievements over the recent years in welfare, women’s issues, and labor policies as matters of citizens’ rights rather than privileges. Chapter 3, entitled “Urban Planning for the Next Century: Putting Human Beings First,” summarizes the SMG’s achievements in the areas of urban planning, urban renewal, safety, transportation, pedestrian convenience, and environmental protection. Chapter 4 discusses the SMG’s achievements in housing, education, culture, the environment, and civilian exchange between South and North Korea, emphasizing the paramount importance of investing in people. Chapter 5, maintaining communication as the start of change, sums up the philosophy underlying policymaking at the Park administration across the areas of social innovation, public innovation, local self-government, and communication and co-governance.” — Preface   Contents CHAPTER 1 ECONOMY CHAPTER 2 WELFARE CHAPTER 3 URBAN POLICIES CHAPTER 4 FUTURE CHAPTER 5 INNOVATION   The Seoul Institute Originally established by the Seoul Metropolitan Government (SMG) as the Seoul Development Institute in 1992, it was renamed the Seoul Institute (SI) on August 1, 2012. The Institute’s goal is to establish medium- to long-term policy visions for Seoul and to propose social policies on welfare, culture, education, industries, urban management, city planning, transportation, safety and the environment. The SI’s primary objectives are to improve metropolitan administration through professional research, to improve the quality of life for citizens in Seoul, and to reinforce and sustain the competitiveness of Seoul.
  • [SI Report] The Seoul Institute Annual Research Digest 2017_Chang Yi
    등록일 2018-03-21 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 5 READS
    The Seoul Institute Annual Research Digest 2017   Author: Chang Yi   Editor’s Note 01 Economy 02 Administration 03 Social & Cultural Issues 04 Transportation Planning 05 Environment & Safety Planning 06 Urban Planning
  • [SI Report] Developing Transport Infrastructure in Seoul (2018) Chang Yi
    등록일 2018-03-21 글쓴이 ssunha 조회수 8 READS
    Developing Transport Infrastructure in Seoul: Planning Implications on Jakarta, Manila, and Ho Chi Minh City   01 Developing Transport Infrastructure in Seoul 02 Jakarta, Indonesia 03 Manila, the Philippines 04 Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Discussion and Conclusion Reference
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  • MITI – Metropolis International Training Institute

The main mission of the Metropolis International Training Institute (MITI) is to strengthen the institutional and professional capacities of local and metropolitan authorities and their leaders for better public governance.

The Metropolis International Training Institute (MITI) is the training and learning center of Metropolis, established in 1996.Today, MITI counts on headquarters located in Seoul, and four regional centers: Cairo, Mashhad, Mexico City and Paris (Île-de-France). Formerly located in Montreal, the headquarters have been transferred to Seoul after a decision taken at the Metropolis Board of Directors’ meeting in Guangzhou, in 2012.

With its relaunch in Seoul, MITI enters a new era of knowledge dissemination, with the boosted activation of its regional centers. MITI will spare no efforts to operate training programs in line with other Metropolis activities, for all members of the Association, and also for its institutional partners and affiliated cities.
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  • 공유도시(Sharing City) 서울은?

시간, 공간, 재능, 물건, 정보 등 누구나 소유하고 있는 것을 함께 나누어 활용함으로써 쓰지 않고 놀리는 자원을 효율적으로 활용하고, 지역경제를 활성화하며, 이웃과 공동체 의식도 형성하고, 환경에도 이로운 활동인 '공유'가 활성화된 도시입니다.

'공유도시 서울' 정책을 추진하게 된 이유는?

복지, 환경, 일자리 등에서 사회적 수요는 급증하고 있으나 한정된 예산과 자원으로 이를 해결하는데 많은 어려움이 있습니다. 또한 급격한 도시화로 공동체 의식이 실종되었고, 과잉소비에 따른 자원고갈과 환경오염 문제가 지속적으로 발생하고 있습니다.
이러한 해결이 어려운 도시의 경제적, 사회적, 환경적 문제들을 '공유'라는 새로운 방법을 통해 완화시켜 나가고자 합니다.